The term “Intersectionality” was coined in 1989 by black feminist scholar Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw.

‘ Crenshaw is known for the introduction and development of intersectionality, the theory of how overlapping or intersecting social identities, particularly minority identities, relate to systems and structures of oppression, domination, or discrimination. Her scholarship was also essential in the development of intersectional feminism which examines the overlapping systems of oppression and discrimination to which women are subject due to their ethnicity, sexuality and economic background. ‘ — Wikipedia

‘ Crenshaw relates intersectionality to a traffic intersection, with traffic flowing in all four directions, so when an accident occurs it could have been a result of cars coming from any one direction, or all of them. She later wrote that reconstructing an accident is difficult and it is unclear who caused the skid marks or which driver was at fault. Which leads to no one held responsible and all parties go back to living their lives. ‘ — Sisterhood Is Forever: The Women’s Anthology for a New Millennium (Wikipedia)

Please read more about intersectionality and about Crenshaw’s work.

 

Each of us and our Intuitive Public Intersections

In addition to terrible intersections of racism, sexism, ableism, & bigotry more commonly discussed (if still desperately not enough), our members of Intuitive community are experiencing intersections that others overwhelmingly misunderstand, mischaracterize, or have never encountered. 

The effects of these misunderstandings and mischaracterizations are immediately and consistently life threatening.

Intersections in need of Intuitive community include…

  • Severe physical disability;
  • Life-threatening environmental sensitivities;
  • The effects of ubiquitous, fraudulently or under-researched environmental contaminants;
  • Divergent or physically compromised communication capacity; 
  • Capital driven professionalism;
  • Systems of financially motivated labeling;
  • Forced “care” & medical coercion;
  • Traumatic incarceration,
  • Housing insecurity & traumatic homelessness;
  • Survivors of human trafficking, especially sex trafficking;
  • Prolonged unnecessary traumatic physical isolation from human contact;
  • Health disparities, especially racial health disparities due to food insecurity and where healthcare is abusive or inaccessible;
  • Family or community abuse based on misinformation from marketers, medical professionals, and policymakers, including non-evidence-based psychiatric marketing;
  • Lived experiences shared truthfully, but denied or refused acknowledgement;

This list includes some, but not all, relevant intersections. (If you would like to add to it, reach out to us at this email address: grow@Intuitive.community.)

The compounded intersectional trauma that emerges around these signposts creates invisible apocalypse circumstances for individuals and families long before the uninitiated are able to notice or verify what’s going on.

When Survivors of Severity are brave enough to tell the truth and ask for help, everyone must listen closely.

We are each and all responsible to create safe community for one another.